September 24, 2021

Keyboard Lesson 3

fingering
  1. General Fingering Rules
  • The fingering always alternates 123 1234 (or 321 4321) so that the same fingering pattern repeats every octave
  • The thumb always stays on the white keys and never on black keys.
  • The fourth finger always plays a black key (when there is a black key to be played in the scale).
  • The fifth finger is only used in practice of scales in all 3 octaves together.
  • When working out scale passages in the literature, consider alternatives that put the fingering patterns in alignment between the hands (thumbs happening together somewhere in the scale).

2. The Fingerings

  • These are just the fingering patterns: Feel free to use finger 5 when appropriate (first note, last note, turning around).
  • Feel free to revert to traditional fingerings, especially when performing the melodic minor scale ascending and descending.
  • In western scale “C” major contains white keys only, so we also use fifth finger in practice of scales.

Example Playing C Major Scale – 2 Octaves:

To play the C major scale with 2 octaves, you just keep heading further on in the upper right direction and get to another C. The fingering will differ slightly.

After you play your first octave, instead of playing finger 5 to end things off, you need to cross your thumb under so you can start your next octave of the scale.

Right Hand 2 Octave Fingering for C Major as shown in the chart below:
1 2 3 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 5

Left Hand 2 Octave Fingering for C Major as shown in the chart below::
5 4 3 2 1 3 2 1 4 3 2 1 3 2 1

Major & Minor Scale Fingering Exercise

Fingering: 1 = Thumb | 2 = index finger | 3 = middle finger | 4 = ring finger | 5 = little finger.

Major Scales Fingering Chart Minor Scales Fingering Chart
C Major
c major
Notes: C D E F G A B C D E F G A B C
Right Hand: 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 5
Left Hand: 5 4 3 2 1 3 2 1 4 3 2 1 3 2 1
A Minor
Am
Notes: A B C D E F G A B C D E F G A
Right Hand: 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 5
Left Hand: 5 4 3 2 1 3 2 1 4 3 2 1 3 2 1
G Major
G major
Notes: G A B C D E F♯G A B C D E F♯G
Right Hand: 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 5
Left Hand: 5 4 3 2 1 3 2 1 4 3 2 1 3 2 1
E Minor
Em
Notes: E F♯G A B C D E F♯G A B C D E
Right Hand: 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 5
Left Hand: 5 4 3 2 1 3 2 1 4 3 2 1 3 2 1
D Major
D major
Notes: D E F♯G A B C♯D E F♯G A B C♯D
Right Hand: 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 5
Left Hand: 5 4 3 2 1 3 2 1 4 3 2 1 3 2 1
B Minor
Bm
Notes: B C♯D E F♯G A B C♯D E F♯G A B
Right Hand: 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 5
Left Hand: 4 3 2 1 4 3 2 1 3 2 1 4 3 2 1
A Major
A Major
Notes: A B C♯D E F♯G♯A B C♯D E F♯G♯A
Right Hand: 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 5
Left Hand: 5 4 3 2 1 3 2 1 4 3 2 1 3 2 1
F♯ Minor
Gbm
Notes: F♯G♯A B C♯D E F♯G♯A B C♯D E F♯
Right Hand: 3 4 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 1 2 3
Left Hand: 4 3 2 1 3 2 1 4 3 2 1 3 2 1 3
E Major
E major
Notes: E F♯G♯A B C♯D♯E F♯G♯A B C♯D♯E
Right Hand: 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 5
Left Hand: 5 4 3 2 1 3 2 1 4 3 2 1 3 2 1
C♯ Minor
Dbm
Notes: C♯D♯E F♯G♯A B C♯D♯E F♯G♯A B C♯
Right Hand: 3 4 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 1 2 3
Left Hand: 3 2 1 4 3 2 1 3 2 1 4 3 2 1 3
B Major
B Major
Notes: B C♯D♯E F♯G♯A♯B C♯D♯E F♯G♯A♯B
Right Hand: 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 5
Left Hand: 4 3 2 1 4 3 2 1 3 2 1 4 3 2 1
G♯ Minor
Abm
Notes: G♯A♯B C♯D♯E F♯G♯A♯B C♯D♯E F♯G♯
Right Hand: 3 4 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 1 2 3
Left Hand: 3 2 1 3 2 1 4 3 2 1 3 2 1 2 3
F♯ Major/G♭ Major
Gb major
Notes (F♯): F♯G♯A♯B C♯D♯E♯F♯G♯A♯B C♯D♯E♯F♯
Notes (G♭): G♭A♭B♭C♭D♭E♭F G♭A♭B♭C♭D♭E♭F G♭
Right Hand: 2 3 4 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 1 2
Left Hand: 4 3 2 1 3 2 1 4 3 2 1 3 2 1 2
D♯ Minor
Ebm
Notes: D♯E♯F♯G♯A♯B C♯D♯E♯F♯G♯A♯B C♯D♯
Right Hand: 3 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 1 2 3
Left Hand: 2 1 4 3 2 1 3 2 1 4 3 2 1 3 2
D♭ Major
Db Major
Notes: D♭E♭F G♭A♭B♭C D♭E♭F G♭A♭B♭C D♭
Right Hand: 2 3 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 1 2
Left Hand: 3 2 1 4 3 2 1 3 2 1 4 3 2 1 3
B♭ Minor
Bbm
Notes: B♭C D♭E♭F G♭A♭B♭C D♭E♭F G♭A♭B♭
Right Hand: 2 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 1 2 3 4
Left Hand: 2 1 3 2 1 4 3 2 1 3 2 1 4 3 2
A♭ Major
Ab major
Notes: A♭B♭C D♭E♭F G A♭B♭C D♭E♭F G A♭
Right Hand: 3 4 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 1 2 3
Left Hand: 3 2 1 4 3 2 1 3 2 1 4 3 2 1 3
F Minor
Fm
Notes: F G A♭B♭C D♭E♭F G A♭B♭C D♭E♭F
Right Hand: 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4
Left Hand: 5 4 3 2 1 3 2 1 4 3 2 1 3 2 1
E♭ Major
Eb
Notes: E♭F G A♭B♭C D E♭F G A♭B♭C D E♭
Right Hand: 3 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 1 2 3
Left Hand: 3 2 1 4 3 2 1 3 2 1 4 3 2 1 3
C Minor
Cm
Notes: C D E♭F G A♭B♭C D E♭F G A♭B♭C
Right Hand: 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 5
Left Hand: 5 4 3 2 1 3 2 1 4 3 2 1 3 2 1
B♭ Major
Bb
Notes: B♭C D E♭F G A B♭C D E♭F G A B♭
Right Hand: 2 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 1 2 3 4
Left Hand: 3 2 1 4 3 2 1 3 2 1 4 3 2 1 3
G Minor
Gm
Notes: G A B♭C D E♭F G A B♭C D E♭F G
Right Hand: 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 5
Left Hand: 5 4 3 2 1 3 2 1 4 3 2 1 3 2 1
F Major
F maj
Notes: F G A B♭C D E F G A B♭C D E F
Right Hand: 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4
Left Hand: 5 4 3 2 1 3 2 1 4 3 2 1 3 2 1
D Minor
Dm
Notes: D E F G A B♭C D E F G A B♭C D
Right Hand: 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 5
Left Hand: 5 4 3 2 1 3 2 1 4 3 2 1 3 2 1
Major & Minor Fingering Scales

Basics Of Keyboard Piano Chords

When you actually start to learn music theory and read music to play on the piano, you’ll notice that chords are mainly played with the left-hand while the right-hand plays the melody. When you’re just starting out, it’s a good idea to start with only the major and minor chords.

Chords are used to play along with the melody of a song. There are many different types of chords; the most common are major and minor chords. Or a chord is a group of notes, which are played together. On electronic keyboards, it is possible to play a chord using only one finger in the extreme left octave. Find the auto bass chord section (eg. Yamaha Keyboards), or Casio-chord section (eg. Casio keyboards), or chord intelligence (eg. Rolland) and select the single finger position. This will allow you to play chords using only one fingers. On electronic keyboards, chords can also be played with three, four or sometimes more fingers. Chords are usually played with the left hand and the melody is played with the right. Keyboard Chords, are formed by combining two or more scale notes. You know the notes that comprise all 12 major scales and you can play these scales smoothly and not quickly. Begin combining the scale notes to form chords. We will begin our study with the simplest and most common type of piano chords, the triad.In Western music, most harmony is based on chords. In other words chords are groups of notes built on major or minor triads (3 notes). In traditional triadic chords, there are always at least three notes in a chord. The notes of the chord may be played at the same time, or may overlap, or may be played separately but in a quick enough succession that they will be “heard” as a chord.

What are the Main Types of Piano Chords?

A chord is created when more than one note is played at once, and contains three, or more individual notes. The main type of chord that you will be learning is called a triad. A triad is a three note chord. A triad contains a root note and two other notes, most often the notes that produce the intervals of a third and fifth above the root note. There are four main types of piano chords. They are called major, minor, Major Seventh Chords, and Minor Seventh Chords, respectively. All four chord types contain three scale degrees called: 

1.) The Root (The First) 

2.) The Third 

3.) The Fifth 

The root is the letter name of the chord. For example, in a C major chord, C is the root. Often, the root is the lowest note of the chord. However, chords may also be inverted. This alters the order or arrangement of the notes. In order to understand any chord, you must first understand intervals.

What are the Most Important Piano Keyboard Chords to Learn?

While it’s great to be able to know all the piano chords, there are a handful of chord types that will be most helpful to you as a Indian keyboardist. These include Major, Minor, Major Seventh Chords, and Minor Seventh Chords, respectively . For playing Bollywood songs it is important to learn major and minor chords as a primary lesson in this website.

The Major Chord Formula (3-Step formula to build any major chord)

A triad is a 3-note chord. There is an easy 3-step formula for building any major triad.

Let’s use A Major as an example.

  1. Start from the root of the chord. That is the first note of your chord. The root of an A Major chord is “A”.
  2. Move 4 half-steps to the right. That is the second note of your chord. 4 half-steps up from “A” is “C#”.
  3. Move 3 more half-steps to the right. That is the third note of your chord. 3 half-steps up from “C#” is “E”.

Or simply major chord formula is given below:

From the Root note, Move 4 half-steps to the right, Move 3 more half-steps to the right

Building an A Major Chord: Root, 4 half steps, 3 half steps

A Major Chord: A – C# – E

Half-Step: one note, regardless whether it is black or white, in either direction from the current note. For example, C# is one half-step above C. E is one half-step below F.

The Minor Chord Formula (3-Step formula to build any minor chord)

There is also an easy 3 step formula to build any minor chord.

Or simply major chord formula is given below:

Building an A Major Chord: : Root, up 3 half-steps, up 4 half-steps.

Let’s use C Minor as an example.

  1. Start from the root of the chord. That is the first note of your chord. The root of a Cm chord is “C”.
  2. Move 3 half-steps to the right. That is the second note of your chord. 3 half-steps up from “C” is “Eb”.
  3. Move 4 more half-steps to the right. That is the third note of your chord. 4 half-steps up from “Eb” is “G”.

Building a Cm Chord: Root, 3 half steps, 4 half steps

C Minor Chord: C – Eb – G

minor scale

Showing above C minor chord: C – Eb – G and F# minor chord: F# – A – C# Chords